Author Archives: Frida

Robin Hood fighting with Little  John

Sherwood Forest and Robin Hood Festival 2014

While living in Nottingham, it is a must to visit the one of the biggest attraction of Nottinghamshire – the legendary Sherwood Forest.  Much smaller than it used to be, it is still a shelter to many plants, trees, birds and insects species. This deciduous forest is well known for having one of the oldest trees in Europe, including The Major Oak estimated to be ca. 800 – 1000 years. Its massive root and wide branches are believed to be a hideout of Robin Hood and Merry Man. Since 18th century the tree is supported by a system of scaffolding which prevents the limbs from braking. Slightly disappointing, however fully understandable is the fact, that the tree is on a fenced, not accessible area, so that the visitors can see it only from the distance.  Nevertheless its immensity makes still a great impression.

We decided to visit the Sherwood Forest during the last day of  Robin Hood Festival, which is held since 1984 and lasts one week. During this time visitors can go back to the Middle Ages and meet Robin Hood and other characters from the legend. It is a great opportunity to experience the folklore of medieval England and take part in many outdoor activities.  Unfortunately we came in the evening, but still we had a short archery class and could learn how to weave a garland. I wish we had have more time, but we can always pop in this year.

 

 

Great Britain in a newcomer’s view

Everything which astonishes me, delights me, or scares me in the UK

This blog is about impressions of a newcomer from Eastern Europe who temporarily settled down in the East Midlands – a region with green hilly fields and middle seized cities with industrial past, so similar to many others on the British Isles.  Is there anything special about that? For some it might be the Sherwood Forrest and the still alive legend of Robin Hood. For others the birth and work place of D.H. Lawrence.  For me however, it is  Nottingham with its universities and people who made me come back here after 3 months of an internship.

So here I am surrounded by green hills and red brick terraced houses and here are my experiences of how it is to live in the UK.  I am writing about how it differs from my expectations, what works better than in my country and what fails even more. I am also writing about  people, places and recipes – every encounter with the British culture.

Fresh glance at British cuisine

Butternut Love by Joanna Oleskow

Butternut Love (http://meandtheuk.develion.com)

British cuisine is often considered heavy and boring. Eggs&bacon, beans&sausages or fish&chips widely served  in pubs and restaurants and beloved by British people are one of the things that tourists and foreigners living in the UK mainly dislike about the  country. However it is only part of the cuisine on the Isles.

While passing through markets and green groceries  I noticed a lot of vegetables that I haven’t seen before, e.g. swede, butternut squash, sweet potatos, curly kale and celery.  The common availability of this kind of food made me curious about British recipes and servings and here are some results of my research.

The first protagonist is celery. Its crispy and juicy steams are great fresh in salads and side dishes, but they are also a very nice ingredient for soups and bakes.